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Old Town San Diego and State Historic Park
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Old Town San Diego and State Historic Park

All photographs taken by Kenneth A. Larson. All rights reserved. © 2004 - 2017.


European colonization of California began only a few steps from what is now Old Town San Diego and State Historic Park. On July 16, 1769, Father Junipero Serra founded Mission San Diego de Alcalá, the first mission built in Alto California, nearby on Presidio Hill. Road Trip when this place was visited
Road Trip Article 2005
Road Trip Article 2006
Road Trip Article 2008
Road Trip Article 2016
The Presidio was also home to a military presence. The mission later moved six miles east because of conflicts between the native people and the soldiers at the Presidio. Following an attack on the mission, it returned to Presidio Hill for eight months, then returned to the second location where it has been ever since. Following Mexican Independence in 1821, soldiers began building adobe houses below Presidio Hill. Soon a pueblo began around five houses belonging to the Carrillo, Ruiz, Marron, Serrano, and Ybañes families. By 1825, a street system around a central plaza was forming around those first five homes. José Antonio Estudillo and his brother-in-law, Juan Bandini began two large structures in 1827 which still stand today. The city of San Diego continued to grow and now surrounds the mission at its final location.

With the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, signed February 2, 1848, Mexico ceded Alta California to the United States. In one stroke, the northern half of the young Republic of Mexico became the United State Southwest. This ended the Mexican-American War and Mexico was paid $15,000,000.00 plus $3,500,000.00 reparations for California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado. Now you know why so many local city, street, and geographic names sound Spanish. San Diego was now a city in the United States. On September 9, 1850, President Fillmore signed the bill to admite California as the 31st state. Following the discoverey of gold in California on January 24, 1848 by James Marshall, emigrants poored into Californai from all corners of the world, but mostly from the United States. Old town began to change once it became part of America. The town suffered from a decline in the military presence, fire was a constant problem, storms in 1861 caused flooding, an earthquake in 1862 followed by a smallpox epidemic caused further decline, drought devastated the surrounding ranches, the development of "New Town" lured away government and business and finally a fire in 1872 destroyed seven buildings and the courthouse and along with them, hope of revitalization.The imigration to California hasn't stopped since with occasional spikes such as returning veterans after World War Two who had gotten a taiste of California before shipping out or upon retuning from the Pacific theater of war.

In 1907, John D, Spreckels purchased the remains of La Casa de Estudillo and began to revive Old Town. Further restorations continued and Old TownSan Diego became a State Historic Park in 1968.Today, Old Town San Diego consists of a collection of original buildings in their original locations, some buildings that have been moved to Old Town from elsewhere in San Diego, and a few reproductions of buildings. There are also foundations and artifacts of earlier buildings and various markers. Just east is Presidio Hill where the first mission in California was founded along with the first military presence. Today, the Serra Museum rests atop the hill to commemorate Father Serra who founded the mission. Within the various buildings of Old Town are museums, churches, shops, restaurants, and a Visitor Center with a beautiful model of San Diego about 200 years ago. Old Town encompasses an area of about 20 blocks. Docent lead tours are offered and the several restored buildings are open as museums. A few blocks southeast is Heritage Park, a collection of buildings from about 1880 to 1920.

Old Town Plaza

Entrance
Entrance at San Diego Avenue and Twiggs. Photo date: 6-13-04.

Entrance at San Diego Avenue and Twiggs. Photo date: 5-8-05.

Old Town Station
The Old Town Station, only a few steps away from the Visitor Center, makes Old Town accessible to those without cars. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Model Model
As a retired professional model maker, I appreciate a well made model when I see one. I was very impressed with this beautiful model of San Diego Old Town as it was about 200 years ago. Photo Date: 1-11-04.

West side of San Diego Avenue

Tin Smith
Tin Smith. Photo date: 6-13-04.

Tin Smith. Photo date: 5-14-06.

Area along San Diego Avenue, between Tin Smith and Gum Saan. Photo date: 5-14-06.

Area along San Diego Avenue, between Tin Smith and Gum Saan. Photo date: 6-13-04.

Area along San Diego Avenue, between Tin Smith and Gum Saan. Photo date: 6-13-04.

West side of San Diego Avenue, south end. Photo date: 5-14-06.

West side of San Diego Avenue, south end. Shame on Amanda and Kate for carving their names in this cactus. Photo date: 5-14-06.

Looking north along the south end of the west side of San Diego Avenue. Photo date: 5-14-06.
West Side
Looking north along San Diego Avenue on the west side of the Plaza. Photo Date: 1-11-04.

Gum Saan
Gum Saan. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Mercantile
Mercantile. Photo date: 6-13-04.

El Centro Artesano is a pottery store between the Mercantile and Dentist. Photo date: 5-14-06.

Dentist/Physician & Candles. Photo date: 5-14-06.
Dentist/Physician & Candles
Dentist/Physician & Candles. Photo date: 6-13-04.



San Diego Avenue
Looking south along San Diego Avenue. Old Town General Store and Cousin's Candy Store are at right. Photo date: 6-13-04.

Old Town General Store (left) and Cousin's Candy Store (right). Photo date: 5-14-06.

Looking north at the west side of San Diego Avenue, about the mid-point. Old Town General Store and Cousin's Candy Store are at left. Photo date: 5-14-06.

My wife loves the candy store at the center of this photo looking north on San Diego Avenue. Photo date: 6-13-04.
San Diego Avenue
Looking north on San Diego Avenue. Photo date: 6-13-04.
North of West Side
Court House and Colorado. Photo Date: 1-11-04.

Court House and Colorado House. Photo Date: 5-11-08.
Court House
Court House and Colorado House. Photo Date: 1-11-04.

Courthouse

Court House was the heart of the Anglo-American Civic Center.

Colorado House was built in 1851 by Cave J. Couts. He married Ysidora Bandini. The building was used as a hotel, saloon, and gaming parlor. It currently is home to Wells Fargo Museum.
Court House
Court House. Photo date: 6-13-04.

Court House (center), back side. Colorado House at left, Casa de Estudillo beyond. Photo date: 5-8-05.

Colorado House

Cave Johnson Couts, a former Army officer and explorer of the Colorado River, built Colorado House which opened in spring of 1851 as a lodging, restaurant, and recreational establishment. Couts helped survey and subdivide El Pueblo de San Diego after the Mexican-American War. He married into the Bandini family which placed him in control of Rancho Guajome and he closed the Colorado House only nine months after opening it. The building reopened in 1853 as a hotel, professional building, and San Diego Herald newspaper office by a group including William Blunt Couts (brother to Cave). In 1866, Marcus Schiller and Joseph Mannasse (a Wells Fargo agent) bought the building from William Couts and ran it jointly with the adjacent Franklin House as a hotel until both were destroyed by fire in 1872. The California State Parks Foundation and Wells Fargo Bank reconstructed the Colorado House on its original location. Today, Wells Fargo Bank operates museum in the building.
Colorado House
Colorado House contains a Wells Fargo Museum with a stage coach. Photo date: 6-13-04.

Back side of Colorado House. Photo date: 5-8-05.


Wells Fargo.

Colorado and Racine & Laramie. Photo Date: 1-11-04.
Racine & Laramie was built in 1868 and was San Diego's first tobacco store and bank exchange. The building was used as a saloon in 1868. The present structure is a recreation of the original.

Back side of Casa de Machado Y Silvas (left), Racine & Laramie (center), and Colorado House (right). Photo date: 5-14-06.
West Side
West side of Plaza. Photo Date: 1-11-04.
Casa de Machado Y Silvas
Casa de Machado Y Silvas houses a museum. Photo Date: 1-11-04.
Casa de Machado Y Silvas was built in 1830 and the current building is a complete restoration. Casa de Machado Y Silvas is also now as "House of the Flag" because the Mexican flag was hidden in the building when American troops advanced on the settlement during the war.
Casa de Machado Y Silvas
Casa de Machado Y Silvas interior museum. Photo Date: 6-13-04.
Casa de Machado Y Silvas
Casa de Machado Y Silvas interior museum. Photo Date: 6-13-04.


Casa de Machado Y Silvas
Casa de Machado Y Silvas back courtyard. Photo Date: 6-13-04.
Casa de Machado Y Silvas
Casa de Machado Y Silvas back courtyard. Photo Date: 6-13-04.


U. S. House
Charless Noell brought the prefabricated U. S. House to San Diego in 1850. The house was purchased in San Francisco. Another story states that U. S., House began as a Sears kit. U. S. House began as a store, then later became a bar, restaurant, and boarding house.

San Diego House. Photo date: 6-13-04.

San Diego House. Photo date: 6-13-04.
The San Diego House at Old Town was reconstructed in 1985. The date of the original adobe home's construction is not known. In 1841, American ship captain Henry D. Fitch converted the adobe home into a store and bar. He operated this establishment for six years before Richard Freeman and Allen B. Light, two black pioneers, acquired the building and made it into a saloon named San Diego House. Allen Light left San Diego in 1850 and Richard Freeman died in 1851. Anita Freeman, daughter, inherited the building and continued operating it until 1857 when it was torn down to allow the construction of the American Hotel.
Casa de Writington
Casa de Tomas Writington, Bailey and McGuire Pottery. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Casa de Writington
Casa de Tomas Writington, Bailey and McGuire Pottery. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Casa de Writington
Casa de Tomas Writington, Bailey and McGuire Pottery. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Casa de Writington
Casa de Tomas Writington, Bailey and McGuire Pottery. Photo date: 6-13-04.
The original Casa de Tomas Writington was built in 1840. At one time, it was used as a U.S. Military hospital. Now home to Bailey and McGuire Pottery.


North Side of Plaza

Flag Pole
Flag pole. Photo Date: 1-11-04.

Photo Date: 5-8-05.
Flag Pole
Photo Date: 6-13-04.
Flag Pole
Photo Date: 6-13-04.
Note that the flag is at half staff. President Ronald Regan was buried two days before.


5-10-08.



5-11-08.


This replica of the original flag stands in the center of the plaza. The original was made from a ship's mast.

End of the Kearney Trail
This monument is to The End of the Kearney Trail, December 12, 1846. Photo Date: 1-11-04.



Robinson Rose/Visitor Center. Photo date: 5-8-05.
Robinson Rose
Robinson Rose/Visitor Center from south of the flag pole. Photo date: 6-13-04.

Robinson Rose, 1853, was the first commercial structure in San Diego. It is now the Visitor Center.


Light fixture at Robinson Rose. Photo date: 5-8-05.

Wagon at Robinson Rose. Photo date: 5-8-05.

McCoy House
McCoy House. Photo Date: 1-11-04.
Behind the Visitor Center is a reproduction of the McCoy House, originally built in 1869 by Sheriff James McCoy. It is used as the Interpretive Center.

McCoy House. Photo Date: 6-15-04.

McCoy House. Photo Date: 6-15-04.

East side of Calhoun Street

Bazaar Del Mundo
Bazaar Del Mundo. Photo Date: 6-15-04.
Bazaar Del Mundo
Bazaar Del Mundo. Photo Date: 1-11-04.


In 2005-2006, Bazaar Del Mundo was replaced with Plaza Del Pasado. A block to the northeast, is a new shopping area called Bazaar Del Mundo Shops. There was some community opposition, but the new Plaza is generally in harmony with the surroundings.





El Fandango
El Fandango. Photo date: 6-13-04.
El Fandango
El Fandango. Photo date: 6-13-04.

El Fandango. Photo date: 5-10-08.

El Fandango. Photo date: 5-10-08.
Old Town Plaza
Old Town Plaza from El Fandango restaurant. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Old Town Plaza
Old Town Plaza from El Fandango restaurant. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Alvarado House
Alvarado House. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Alvarado House was built in 1824 of wood. It was the home of the sister of the last Mexican Governor. This reproduction is now the General Store.
Shumup Ko Hup
Shumup Ko Hup. Photo Date: 1-11-04.

Shumup Ko Hup. Photo Date: 6-13-04.

Shumup Ko Hup. Photo Date: 5-8-05.


Cosmopolitan - Casa de Bandini

The Cosmopolitan began as a one-story adobe home to the prominent Jose Bandini who sold it to Albert Seeley. Albert Lewis Seeley (1822-1899) was born in Illinois in 1822 and became a stagecoach driver in Texas and Los Angeles. He came to San Diego with his English wife, Emily, and their six children in 1867. He started the United States Mail Stage Line and later gained the contract to carry mail over the San Diego to Los Angeles section of the Tucson to Los Angeles mail run. He also carried passengers between Yuma and Los Angeles. On May 1, 1869 he purchased the Bandini residence to use as a depot and for accommodations. He added a second floor of wood to the original adobe structure and opened it as The Cosmopolitan Hotel. It was judged "one of the roomiest and most comfortable hotel buildings in Southern California" by The San Diego Union newspaper. The two-story building is an L shape with a court yard behind. Adjacent stables were also built in 1869 to support the stage lines. Over the next ten years, Seeley's business expanded to included more runs to more locations including Julian. The railroads cut into his business such that by 1887, the only remaining run was from San Diego to Ocean Beach. Later in 1887, Seeley sold the Cosmopolitan and the stable and he and his wife moved to San Francisco.

After, the building became an olive packing plant (1900), a hotel, motel, and restaurant. The building was extensively restored in 2010 as a restaurant and saloon with entertainment.

Hours:
Monday - Friday 11:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Saturday - Sunday 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Saturday - Sunday 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM (brunch menu)

Address:
2660 Calhoun Street
San Diego, CA 92110
Phone: 619-297-1874
Located in Old Town San Diego.

Seeley Stable Museum

Albert Lewis Seeley, born 1822 in Illinois, came to San Diego in 1867 with his family and started the United States Mail Stage Line. In March of 1868, Mr. Seeley bought Casa de Bandini as described above to provide a depot for his stage line. It was at this same time that Mr. Seeley built the original stable adjacent to the hotel. Mr. Seeley acquired a partner, Charles Write, in 1869 and the stage line prospered and grew. Eventually business declined with the popularity of the railroads and Seeley sold the hotel and stable in 1887.

This building is a reconstruction of the original. Behind the stable is a courtyard with The Blacksmith Shop Wood Shop, numerous wagons, and a piece of the Plank Road that once crossed the sand dunes east of town.
Seeley Stable
Seeley Stable an hour before opening. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Wagons
Wagons. Photo Date: 1-11-04.

The Theater. Photo date: 6-13-04.

East side of San Diego Avenue

Old Town Market occupies the south end of the block between San Diego Avenue and Calhoun, on the north side of Twiggs. It includes several buildings, including Casa de Aguirre. In the courtyard, there is a small stage where the visitor can sometimes stumble onto a light play or comedy act.

Old Town Market along Twiggs. Photo date: 5-14-06.

Casa de Aguirre (AKA Old Town Market) on the east side of San Diego Avenue. Photo date: 5-14-06.
Old Town Market
Old Town Market, east side. Photo Date: 1-11-04.
Old Town Market
Old Town Market, east side. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Old Town Market
Old Town Market. Photo Date: 1-11-04.
Beneath The Old Town Market is the foundation of Casa de Aguirre, 1853. A window in the patio allows a view of part of the original foundation. A reproduction of the building is ten feet shorter to allow the window view of the original stone pilings.
Old Town Market
Old Town Market. Photo date: 5-8-05.
Old Town Market
Old Town Market Stage. Photo date: 5-8-05.
Old Town Market
Old Town Market. Photo date: 5-8-05.
Old Town Market
Old Town Market, north side. Photo date: 5-8-05.

La Sirena. Photo date: 5-14-06.




Looking at the east side of the south end of San Diego Avenue, past Casa de Pedrorena de Altamirano (Miner's Gems), Printing Office (San Diego Union), and Casa de Aguirre (AKA Old Town Market).


Printing Office
San Diego Union - Printing Office at right, Casa de Pedrorena de Altamirano (Miner's Gems) at left. . Photo date: 5-8-05.
Casa de Pedrorena de Altamirano
Casa de Pedrorena de Altamirano. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Miner's Gems backs on Calhoun.

Casa de Estudillo


Casa de Estudillo, north side. Photo date: 5-11-08.
Casa de Estudillo
Casa de Estudillo. Courtyard. Photo Date: 1-11-04.

West side of Calhoun Street.


Photo Date: 5-8-05.
Miner's Gems fronts on San Diego Avenue.
Miner's Gems
Miner's Gems. Photo Date: 6-13-04.

Miner's Gems. Photo Date: 5-8-05.

Miner's Gems. Photo Date: 5-8-05.

Miner's Gems. Photo Date: 5-14-06.

Toler Lether Depot. Photo Date: 6-13-04.

Toler Lether Depot. Photo Date: 5-8-05.

West side of Old Town

Old Town
This space bnetween buildings leads to Casa de Machado Y Stewart and Mason Street School.

Casa de Machado Y Stewart

Casa de Machado Y Stewart is on the west side of Old Town, behind other buildings.
Casa de Machado Y Stewart
Casa de Machado Y Stewart. Photo Date: 1-11-04.
Casa de Machado Y Stewart
Casa de Machado Y Stewart. Photo Date: 1-11-04.

Mason Street School

The Mason Street School was built in 1865 and originally located on Mason Street west of San Diego Avenue.

There had been sporadic public schooling in San Diego for 15 years. School was held in various places and with a succession of teachers. Some years there was no teacher available. In 1965, the community gathers together to build a school. The school was probably built from salvaged lumber and the roof was completed by the village blacksmith, Frank Parsons. The Mason Street School - District No. 1 was the first public school in Southern California. A request was made to the State Superintendent of schools for a teacher.

Mary Chase Walker became the first teacher, having lest her native east coast in April 1865 and arriving in San Diego on July 5, 1865. Mary taught for only eleven months before resigning to marry Ephraim W. Morse, the president of the school board.

Five more teachers followed Mary before the school closed in 1872 when a new four-room school was built. Attendance averaged 35 students, aged four to seventeen in eight grades. The building was sold to Mr. Connors who moved it a half mile to the corner of Taylor and Whitman Street. Mr. Connors cut off he front third of the building and reattached it to the side. A lean-to was added, the open end closed, and the interior was partitioned.

The building was used as a home until about 1918 and then was home to the Old Town Tamale Factory until about 1946 when it was condemned and almost demolished.

Several historical preservation groups teamed to stop the demolition and the city agreed to return the building to its original location. The building was restored and reopened on July 1, 1955. About 85% of the building is original, the rest came from buildings of similar age. The Board of Education provided desks although the original building probably had benches or desks of a different design. Adult education classes are still held in the school house which is open seven days a week and is operated by San Diego County Historical Days Association. State Registered Landmark No. 538.
Mason Street School
Mason Street School. Photo Date: 1-11-04.
Mason Street School
Mason Street School. Photo Date: 1-11-04.

Mason Street School. Photo Date: 5-8-05.

Mason Street School. Photo Date: 5-8-05.

Southwest Corner

A little south of Mason Street School is a quiet area.

Oven. Photo date: 5-8-05.

Well. Shame on Juan for carving his name in this cactus. Photo date: 5-8-05.

South End of Old Town

South side of Twiggs looking east toward San Diego Avenue. Photo date: 5-8-05.

Church of the Immaculate Conception

The Church of the Immaculate Conception was begun in 1868 with the laying of the corner stone but was not dedicated until 1919. The first Parish Church was established nearby on Conde Street in 1849 and still stands as the Old Adobe Chapel. The Church of the Immaculate Conception is at the corner of San Diego Avenue and Twiggs. Masses are celebrated Saturday evening, Sunday morning, and Sunday evening.
Church of the Immaculate Conception
Church of the Immaculate Conception, exterior. Photo date: 5-8-05.
Church of the Immaculate Conception
Church of the Immaculate Conception, exterior. Photo date: 5-14-06.

Old Adobe Chapel

The Old Adobe Chapel was originally built as a home in 1850 for John Brown. Don Jose Aguirre converted it into a church in 1858. The WPA rebuilt the adobe close to the original site in 1937. The church is California Registered Historic Landmark No. 49.
Old Adobe Chapel
From northeast. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Old Adobe Chapel
From northwest. Photo date: 6-13-04.
History Exhibit
This obscure history exhibit is across the street from the Old Adobe Church on Conde. While a worthwhile stop while in Old Town, it doesn't seem to appear in the guide books. Photo date: 6-13-04.

Casa del Rey Moro

Now African Museum.

Whaley House

Whaley House was built by Thomas Whaley in 1856-7 on grounds once containing an execution site. The house is famous for ghost sightings including a small black dog. The Whaley House is the oldest brick structure not only in San Diego, but Southern California. It once served as the first courthouse and county seat and was the cultural center of the city. It has also been used for a granary, a school, and San Diego's first theater. State Registered Landmark No. 65.

Front of Whaley House. Photo date: 5-8-05.
Whaley House
Court Room. Photo date: 6-13-04.

Derby House





El Campo Cemetery

El Campo Santo (The Holy Field). Between 1849 and 1897, 477 people were buried here, including many prominet San Diego pioneers and it was the Catholic Cemetery for early residents. A number of graves were relocated after 1874 and in 1984, a street railway, which later became San Diego Avenue, bisected the cemetery, reportedly leaving several graves beneath the street. In 1933 a wall was built around the remaining cemetery, perhaps to contain the ghosts some people report seeing. The Cemetery is a few blocks south of the Plaza on San Diego Avenue.

Cemetery
El Campo Santo, the Cemetery. Photo date: 6-13-04.
Cemetery
El Campo Santo, the Cemetery. Photo date: 6-13-04.

San Diego Avenue Continuing South

Old Town continues south of Old Town Historic Park along San Diego Avenue where it bocomes more commercial.
Commercial Area
San Diego Avenue south of the Plaza. Photo date: 6-13-04.

San Diego Avenue looking south past Whaley House. Photo date: 5-8-05.

San Diego Avenue looking north toward Old Town . Photo date: 5-8-05.



The Alamo was a good, quick Mexican meal on San Diego Avenue, but has been replaced by something less good.
Street Art
Photo date: 6-13-04.

Photo date: 5-21-16
San Diego Avenue street art south of the Plaza.




Looking north along San Diego Avenue.

Looking south along San Diego Avenue.

North Side

About 2006, Bazaar del Mundo Shops moved a block northeast and a new developement took over the former space.


Lodging


We were fortunate to get two nights free room at Courtyard by Marriott. It was very nice and walking distance from Old Town.

Best Western, Old Town.

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This page last updated: Monday, 19-Jun-2017 12:20:58 EDT

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