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Hathaway Ranch Museum
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Hathaway Ranch Museum

All photographs taken by Kenneth A. Larson. All rights reserved. © 2014 - 2017.


Jesse Elwood Hathaway was born in Kansas in 1872. At the age of four, following the death of his father, he and his brother were sent to a foster home where they stayed for several years until Jesse ran away to make his own destiny. He had several jobs while attending night school until he was diagnosed with tuberculosis at age 12 and left for the drier climate of California. In Los Angeles, Jesse slept in abandoned houses and washed dishes until at age 18, his mechanical skills earned him an apprenticeship with a water company. He would ride a bicycle to job sites designing and installing some of the first water systems in Los Angeles County. In his spare time he invented mechanical devices, selling the patents.

Lola McCarric was born in 1876 in Eastern Washington and at age 7, upon the death of her mother, she was brought by her father along with her sister to California. The two girls were raised by their maternal grandparents whose children operated a general store on Telegraph Road. Lola attended Little Lake School and Los Angeles High School and studied to be a milliner.

Jesse and Lola met in 1890 in Santa Fe Springs and after a long courtship, they married in 1902. They lived a short time in Los Angeles but Jesse's doctor advised them to move out of the city so they settled on a forty acre farm in Santa Fe Springs. There they raised three sons, Elwood (1908), Richard (Dick)(1910), and Julian (Doc)(1912). The family worked hard on their farm growing potatoes, watermelon, oranges, walnuts, and experimenting in agriculture for a seed company. They also raised hogs, chickens, and cattle.

After twenty years of farming, in 1921, oil was discovered a little northeast of the ranch. This transformed the area and the ranch. The family adapted and in 1929 started an independent oil company. A new Ranch house was built in 1933 and Lola developed the surrounding gardens. Jesse and Dick worked to bring efficiencies and mechanization to ranching as Doc and Elwood devoted themselves to the oil business. Dick met Nadine Applegate, a native of Denver, and they married in 1935 and raised six children over the next thirty years.

Dick was a collector and local historian and created a collection of thousands of historical photographs. Nadine became involved in the preservation of local history and turned the last five acres of the family ranch into a working museum. The museum contains objects used at the ranch from the late 19th century to the mid-20th century. Objects range from domestic objects to vehicles, farm equipment, oil equipment, and a functioning machine shop.

Hours:
Check with the museum for current hours.

11901 East Florence Avenue
Santa Fe Springs, California 90670
310-944-7372
Main house.
Main house.

Main house.
Old gas pum ps and house now used as the office beyond.

Open area.

Chickens.


Machine Shop.
Machine Shop.
Machine Shop.
Machine Shop.


Cattle shoot.

Corn crib for storing cobbs of corn.

Caterpillar tractor engine.

Yard full of old equipment.
Yard full of old equipment.
Yard full of old equipment.


Gas station moved here.

Gas station set up inside an old oil tank.

Old oil tanks, now used as storage sheds.


Pumps.

Tractors.


Vehicles.

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This page last updated: Sunday, 28-Feb-2016 22:35:33 EST

Note:This is not the official site for any of the places shown in Places Earth. Places Earth is not responsible for accuracy of the information. Hours of operations, prices, exhibits, and sometimes locations are subject to change without notice.

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