Header Image 1
Places, Earth
Salton Sea
Header Image 2

National Parks Under Attack
This Web site doesn't like to take political stands, but now it is necessary.

The current administration wants to reduce the size and number of National Monuments and allow oil drilling and mining in National Parks for the first time since the system was established. If you prefer trees and streams to oil wells and pipelines, contact your representatives in Washington NOW and tell them to protect these Crown Jewels of America.

Places Earth extends sympathies and hopes to both the people fighting to restore their lives in Puerto Rica and to those who’s lives have been taken or disrupted by the shooting in Las Vegas. Also to hurricane victims in Texas, Florida, and other areas of the Gulf region. Also to the fire victims in California. So many disasters in short time, all made worse by climate change.

State Parks, Historic Sites, and Museums need your help.

Throughout the country, state parks, historic sites, museums, and similar institutions are struggling to continue operating. Because of general financial problems, many of these institutions are operating on a reduced schedule or in danger of closing. Some are being forced to sell off artifacts and property. Many will not weather these hard times without your help.

Places Earth urges everyone to support these vital and important public resources any way you can. Please donate your treasure, time, and talent. Write to your governor and other elected officials telling them to find a way to keep state parks open. It will be your loss.


Public Service Announcement


Film Los Angeles - bring Hollywood back to Hollywood
Explanation.
This web site contains no paid advertising. Donations help.

Back
Imperial County Main Page

Salton Sea

All photographs taken by Kenneth A. Larson. All rights reserved. © 2009 - 2017.


The Salton Sea that we see today is not the first salton lake to occupy this site. This depression in the Colorado Desert is below sea level and many times the Colorado River as overflowed its banks and created a temporary lake. The lake we see today formed in 1905 when a break in a canal allowed a large flood to fill the depression. In 1901, the California Development Company dug irrigation canals from the Colorado River into Road Trip when this place was visited.
Road Trip Article
the desert of Imperial County. Engineers cut into the western bank of the Colorado River to overcome silting in 1905 which was followed by heavy flood waters that broke out of the canal and most of the river's flow rushed into the valley. The present-day Salton Sea was formed by the time the breach was sealed in 1907.

This region was once part of the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez/Cortés) but was cut off from the sea by the Colorado River Delta. Historic evidence and geologic studies have revealed that the Colorado River has overflown its banks into the Salton Basin many times in the past, creating temporary lakes. The earliest named lake was Lake Cahuilla which formed about 700 A.D when the Colorado River silted up its normal banks and followed two channels northward creating a lake that persisted for about 1,000 years. At least eight times the Colorado River has flooded the Salton Basin between 1824 to 1904, including a flood in 1840 that created a salt lake three quarters of a mile long and a half a mile wide and another flood in June 1891 that created a lake 30 miles long, 10 miles wide.

These lakes have always evaporated in the hot desert sun until now. Today the Salton Sea is maintained through continual agricultural runoff from irrigation in the Imperial and Coachella Valleys. This agricultural run off has both maintained the Sea and may bring it to an end as it brings in salts and pollutants. The New, Whitewater, and Alamo Rivers also supply water to the lake.

The size of the lake varies with the season and the amount of runoff, averaging 15 miles wide by 35 miles long, with a maximum depth of 52 feet. The lake surface is at about 226 to 228 feet below sea level. Salinity is more than ocean water but not as high at the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

The lake is ringed by a number of small towns such as Calipatria, Bombay Beach, Niland, and Salton City. The San Andreas Fault seems to end under the lake with a surface extension of mud pots in a line extending to the southeast. A number of geothermal power plants and even a dry ice well can be found in the area to the southeast end of the lake. The lake is now a recreational lake. The future of the lake is being debated. Evaporation and pollution is slowly destroying the lake.

The lake is easily reached traveling south from Interstate 10 or north from Interstate 8 between State Highway 86 and State Highway 111 in the heart of Imperial County. The north end is in Riverside County.
Near Salton City
Salton Sea. Photo date: 3-14-05.
Near Salton City
Salton Sea. Photo date: 3-14-05.
Near Salton City
Photo date: 3-14-05.
Near Salton City
Photo date: 3-14-05.
This beach was covered with the objects below.
Shells
Photo date: 3-14-05.
Shells
Photo date: 3-14-05.
I'm not sure what these are. The beach was covered with whole and crushed objects that looked to me like barnacles.
Shells
Photo date: 3-14-05.
From Above.
From above.
The east shore around Bombay Beach an hour before the rain started.
The east shore around Bombay Beach an hour before the rain started.

Top Back to Earth Back
Imperial County Main Page

This page last updated: Friday, 28-Apr-2017 14:17:25 EDT

Note:This is not the official site for any of the places shown in Places Earth. Places Earth is not responsible for accuracy of the information. Hours of operations, prices, exhibits, and sometimes locations are subject to change without notice.

Support this Web Site

I hope that you find this web site helpful. It started because of my love for Architecture and interest in History. I don't allow paid advertising (but this may change). This web site is for your benefit and enjoyment and I make no profit on it. For ten years it has been supported primarily from my regular paycheck as a Set Designer and there haven't been many the last few years. I can no longer run it without help. Alternative funding is needed. A non-tax deductable donation helps cover the cost of operating this web site and may be made to Kesign Design Consulting through PayPal.

Buy my Photographs or Art.
My Art

Or donations can be mailed to the address on the contact page.
If you are in the need of a designer, please see my portfolio site www.kesigndesign.com.
Kesign Design Consulting
or Set Design Portfolio.

Links

Home | Contact | Road Trips | Sales | Space | USA| Ken Larson | K L Images | U. S. Mission Trail
Web Design This site maintained by Kenneth A. Larson.
Copyright © 2004 - 2017, Kenneth A. Larson. All Rights Reserved.
Website content including photographic and graphic images may not be redistributed for use on another website.
Please Don't Pirate Videos
Valid HTML 5 Transitional Valid CSS!